Search

Scott Alan Photography

Creating portraits and documenting life!

Back to digital with the Fuji XT 10

In previous posts I explain how I got out of photography for a while and then got back into film photography. I explained that I eventually got back into digital with the Fuji x20. I eventually started doing some paid gigs again and I knew I needed something with interchangeable lenses. In 2016 after doing much research, I decided the right fit for what I wanted and my budget was the Fuji XT 10. I bought that with the 18-55 kit and the 55-200mm. Here are a few shots from one of the first shoots I did with the Fuji.

Fuji x20 continued…

And here is more from the Fuji x20…

Fuji X20

I recently wrote a blog about when I quit photography for a little while in 2012. I stated that I ended up getting back into photography but I started shooting film again. While I enjoyed film photography more than digital (and I still do), digital is at times more practical. I ended up purchasing a Fuji x20, which when it was released, was a “higher end” point and shoot type digital camera. I ended up doing a shoot and I brought it along to make some photos with it. I wanted to see what this little point and shoot could do. Here are a few photos that I did with the Fuji x20.

I utilized the hot shoe on the camera so I could shoot with off camera flash.

Kodak Ektar 100

Here is a photo from one of the first times I shot Kodak Ektar 100 film doing some landscape type stuff.

Sunset at Eagle Mountain Lake

Work The Angles. Work The light.

The most important thing in photography is light (either ambient or flash) and knowing how to use it. Off camera flash can bring a completely different dynamic to a shoot, specially depending upon your surroundings or the environment you’re working in. Working the angles and getting in close can help as well. The first image in this article is basically showing the environment we were working in. We were at a park, under a pavilion, surrounded by picnic tables.

Using flash and different angles I was able to “get away” from the “shooting at a park” look which was my intent.

When I Returned To Film Photography…

I started photography in 1995 during the film era. Sometime in 2000 my dad handed down his Bronica ETRS camera to me. This was the camera he used for many years shooting weddings and little league baseball team photos. After I graduated photogtaphy school in 2001 I went digital. From that point on I was strictly a digital photographer using many different Canon Cameras. I worked full time and ran a part time photography business until early 2012. I got burned out. I shut down my studio, sold my digital cameras, and sold all of my studio equipment. Several months went by and I started to get the itch to start shooting again but I wanted to do it on my terms, not a clients terms. The only cameras I had were two film cameras. I had my Canon Elan 7e and the Bronica ETRS that my dad had given me. I decided to give a go at film photography again. I figured out the film process (and look) is what I had loved and missed about photography. It was kind of intimidating at first to go back to film, because of course with digital you had the screen on the back of the camera to reference. I remember when I first started taking shots on the film camera I’d look at the back as if an image was going to be there. LOL. it didn’t take long to get back into the swing of things. I had to trust my knowledge of photography, trusted what I had learned, and trusted the camera was going to do what it was supposed to do. Here are a couple of portraits (with off camera flash) that I had made when I first got back into film photography.

Camera: Bronica ETRS

Lens: Zenzanon 75mm f2.8

Film: Kodak Portra 400

A couple from my early street photography

Inside my second studio

Recently I posted a video about the second photography studio that I had. Here are just a few of the thousands of images done in that studio.

Set up: I had painted a 9′ wide portion of one of the walls and floor white. I laid down two 4×8 sheets of tile board on the floor which gives the reflection you see in the images.

Lighting: For a seamless white look I used two strobes facing the background / back wall. I would use 1 strobe and a 60″ reversable umbrella or a softbox for the main light up front. With a 60″ umbrella I could photograph 1 person or a group of about 12. That’s the most I’ve shot at once using that set up in this studio.

Gear: Back then I generally shot Canon for all of my digital work. 90% of the time I had on a 50mm f1.8 lens for portrait work done in the studio. This was done on the Canon 7D.

This young lady was a model who made it to be on one of the seasons of America’s Next Top Model. However, she found out she was pregnant before they started shooting so she had to drop out. A couple of years later she decided to get back into modeling and I helped her rebuild her portfolio.

Under the Black Light

I used to subscribe to several photography magazines… for YEARS!!! I read an article in one of the magazines about a photographer who was photographing people under a black light with neon paint. The work I saw him do was amazing. It wasn’t amazing only from a photographic standpoint but he did all of the painting himself. I decided to give a go at it and I did a few themed shoots like that. This is a result from one of those shoots.

Camera: Canon 7D

lens: Canon 50mm f1.8

Settings: ISO 800, f2.8 at 1 second

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: